Spatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome

by Richard F. Miller

Publisher: Oregon State University, Agricultural Experiment Station in Corvallis, Or

Written in English
Published: Pages: 35 Downloads: 701
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Subjects:

  • Sage grouse -- Habitat -- West (U.S.),
  • Sage grouse -- Effect of habitat modification on -- West (U.S.),
  • Sage grouse -- Ecology -- West (U.S.),
  • Bird populations -- West (U.S.)
  • Edition Notes

    StatementRichard F. Miller and Lee L. [i.e., E.] Eddleman.
    SeriesTechnical bulletin -- 151., Technical bulletin (Oregon State University. Agricultural Experiment Station) -- 151.
    ContributionsEddleman, Lee.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 35 p. :
    Number of Pages35
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15571975M

  R. F. Miller and L. L. Eddleman. Spatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome. Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin , Corvallis, USA. Google Scholar. Changes in sage grouse distribution have been due to loss and deterioration of their habitat (Braun, et al. ) Within Utah, greater sage grouse is a state species of concern (UDWR ). Greater sage grouse populations are scattered throughout much of the state except most of . Using Prescribed Fire to Manage Sagebrush Communities in Occupied Sage Grouse Habitats of Wyoming (posted 7/25/00) Spatial and Temporal Changes of Sage Grouse Habitat in the Sagebrush Biome. OSU Technical Bulletin , April (PDF format) Western Sage Grouse Status Conference January , Another species of conservation concern in sagebrush habitat is the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). This species has experienced range-wide population contraction since European settlement of North America due to widespread sagebrush habitat alteration and loss (Schroeder et al. , Knick and Connelly ).

  In: Knick ST, Connelly JW, editors. Greater sage-grouse: ecology and conservation of a landscape species and its habitat. Berkeley, California: University of California Press; pp. 1– 4. Miller RF, Eddleman LE. Spatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome. Predicting climate change impacts on sagebrush ecosystems requires the use of models that typically rely on spatial, temporal or mechanistic information. Spatial correlations capture landscape or regional-scale relationships between average climate and an ecological response, such as the presence or abundance of a focal species. • Martin NS () Sagebrush control related to habitat and sage grouse occurrence. Journal of Wildlife Management – • Miller RF, Chambers JC, Pellant M () A field guide for selecting the most appropriate treatment in sagebrush and pinon-juniper ecosystems in the . Spatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome. Technical Bulletin Technical Bulletin Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR.

Greater Sage-Grouse: Ecology and Conservation of a Landscape Species and Its Habitats - Ebook written by Steve Knick, John W. Connelly. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Greater Sage-Grouse: Ecology and Conservation of a Landscape Species and Its Habitats. Guidelines to manage sage grouse populations and their habitats. Wildlife Soc. Bull. Fautin, R.W. Biotic communities of the northern desert shrub biome in western Utah. Ecol. Monogr. 16(3) Klebenow, D.A. Enhancing sage grouse habitat a Nevada landowner’s guide. Northwest Sage Grouse Working Group Publication. The sage-grouse is distributed throughout shrub-steppe habitat in 11 American states and 2 Canadian provinces and is strongly associated with several species of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.). Long-term population declines of 17–47% have been observed throughout much of the species distribution [15], [16]. considered important sage-grouse habitat (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. ). In order to manage sagelands for the survival of the greater sage-grouse and the continuity of the sagebrush biome, managers face tough land management decisions and will need to understand the role of climate (Compagnoni ; Dalgleish et al. ). Interactions.

Spatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome by Richard F. Miller Download PDF EPUB FB2

Spatial and Temporal Changes of Sage Grouse Habitat in the Sagebrush Biome Abstract Sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasiamus) occur in regions that are spatially diverse and temporally dynamic in western North America. During the past years, significant changes in disturbance regimes have affected their habitat.

Sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasiamus) occur in regions that are spatially diverse and temporally dynamic in western North America. During the past years, significant changes in disturbance regimes have affected their habitat. Plant communities in existence today are unique from any other time period because of altered disturbance regimes, confounded by a continual change.

Spatial and Temporal Changes of Sage Grouse Habitat in the Sagebrush Biome. Spatial and Temporal Changes of Sage Grouse Habitat in the Sagebrush Biome.

Richard F. Miller; Lee Eddelman; Twitter Facebook. This paper describes the spatial diversity of sage grouse range, short- and long-term dynamics and disturbance regimes across this. Spatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome Public Deposited.

Sage grouse -- Ecology -- West (U.S.) Sage grouse -- Effect of habitat modification on -- West (U.S.) Bird populations -- West (U.S.) Technical bulletin (Oregon State. Abstract. Published April Reviewed January Please check for up-to-date information in the OSU Extension Service Catalog:   influences at large spatial and temporal scales important Critical elements within sagebrush landscapes Spatial distribution of important habitat elements Change focus to “quality landscapes” and the elements that create a quality landscape.

Sage-Grouse: Its More than Quality Sagebrush Habitat. The 11 western states with sagebrush-steppe habitat and sage grouse are: Oregon, Washington, California (northern), Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, North and South Dakota. The sagebrush ecosystem is one of the most imperiled in the U.S.

At one time, Spatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome book spread over more thansquare miles, but today has shrunk to 56% of. comprise sage-grouse habitat. It is critical that the relationship between changes in habitat, and changes in sage-grouse popu-lations be defined at multiple scales, given the extended temporal and spatial horizons that frame the ecology of these species.

This paper synthesizes current knowl-edge regarding pertinent topics in sage. Sage-grouse habitat relationships. While many factors likely influence productivity, the only factor that has been consistently manageable is habitat (Connelly et al.Gregg et al.

DeLong et al.Sveum et al. b).The importance of sagebrush (woody Artemisia) as a source of cover and food for sage-grouse is well known (PattersonBraun et al. ), however, sage-grouse. However, fire comes with its own cost in the form of a temporary loss of sagebrush, which creates a spatially and temporally equivalent habitat deficit for sage-grouse (Connelly et al.

), although the effects of sagebrush loss on sage-grouse will vary in accordance with size and dispersion of burned areas over the landscape (Dahlgren et al.

We used random forest algorithms to map seasonal habitat selection for greater sage‐grouse at the southern periphery of their range. Results will provide scale‐appropriate information for management.

cluster, and BSU spatial scales are identified in the USGS state-space model Hierarchical population monitoring of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Nevada and CaliforniaIdentifying — populations for management at the appropriate spatial scale: U.S.

Geological Survey Open-File Reportin the Evaluation Process Section. Sagebrush Community. The sagebrush community is more than just sage grouse and wildlife. It’s the people, too, and the vast complex and wondrous habitats that support all life.

We invite you to explore the natural and cultural history of the sage grouse. There is a statistically significant decline in the area of the sagebrush biome due to encroachment of vegetation from southern ecosystems (r 2 = [where r represents correlation], P.

We used current sage‐grouse range (>74 million ha, Schroeder et al., ) to delineate the sagebrush biome and define the study area boundary (Figure 1). Sage‐grouse distribution provided a requisite for large and unfragmented sagebrush landscapes as >90% of birds occur in areas of >40% sagebrush land‐cover (Knick, Hanser, & Preston, ).

As a focal species, sage grouse habitat needs can help the semi-arid sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) biome of to evaluate spatial and temporal changes in the landscape-scale integrity of areas.

species from sage grouse habitat conserva-tion. They mapped the range of habitats for all the species to determine spatial overlap with sage grouse and evaluated similarity in habitat associations. They also used a cheat-grass risk model to delineate regions likely to be lost as sagebrush habitat altogether.

The greater sage-grouse is endemic to the sagebrush steppe landscape in 11 states in the United States and in two Canadian provinces (see Figure A.1).

The greater sage-grouse is protected by state law throughout its range and managed as an upland gamebird by state wildlife agencies. Sage‐grouse are a broad‐ranging sagebrush obligate species and game bird (Rowland et al.Hanser and Knick ) that occupy the western North America sagebrush biome, extending east of the Sierra Nevada/Cascade Mountain ranges to the western regions of the Great Plains of the United are a lekking species with high site fidelity to their breeding grounds (Patterson illustrate the relative value of sagebrush habitats to sage-grouse on year-round and sagebrush biome and has the potential to impact of a livestock industry initiated dramatic changes in spatial and temporal patterns of grazing within sagebrush communities (Miller et al., ).

Long periods. Concerns over sage-grouse and associated habitats have set in motion sweeping Federal and State land management plan changes and proactive sci- ence-based conservation actions to address threats within the realm of management control.

importance of landscape context versus local habitat for nesting sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

A gallina-ceous species native only to western semiarid sagebrush habitats, sage-grouse were previously widespread, but loss and degradation of sagebrush habitat has resulted in extirpation of the species from almost half of its original.

RF Miller, LE EddlemanSpatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome Technical BulletinOregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR, USA ().

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), also known as the sagehen, is the largest grouse (a type of bird) in North America. Its range is sagebrush country in the western United States and southern Alberta and Saskatchewan, was known as simply the sage grouse until the Gunnison sage-grouse was recognized as a separate species in Spatial and Temporal Changes of Sage Grouse Habitats in the Sagebrush Biome.

Richard F. Miller, Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center, Oregon State University, HC 71 Burns, ORUSA. Sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) occur in regions that are spatially diverse and temporally dynamic in western North America.

During the. National Sage-Grouse Conservation Framework Planning Team Richard St. Prescott, AZ [email protected] This report should be cited as: Connelly, J. W., S. Knick, M. Schroeder, and S. Stiver. Conservation Assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and Sagebrush Habitats.

Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Miller, Richard F., and Lee. L Eddleman. Spatial and Temporal Changes of Sage-grouse Habitat in the Sagebrush Biome. Technical Bulletin Oregon State University, Agricultural Experiment Station.

Reprinted July Hagen, Christian. Sage-grouse Strategy Plan for Oregon: A Plan to Maintain and Enhance Populations and Habitat.

Draft. habitats and competition for food or cover may affect some sage-grouse populations. 5 Dense sagebrush canopy cover lowers sage-grouse habitat quality and biological diversity.

Sagebrush canopy cover should not exceed 15% on lower-elevation sites or 25% on mountainous sites. (Left Photo = 15% mountain big sagebrush canopy cover. Smith, K.T. Identifying habitat quality and population response of greater sage-grouse to treated Wyoming big sagebrush habitats.

PhD dissertation, University of Wyoming, Laramie. Wyoming Game and Fish Department. Wyoming Game and Fish Department protocols for treating sagebrush to benefit sage-grouse. Boundary for floristic regions used for the conservation assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and sagebrush habitat conducted by the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

The floristic provinces were digitized from a figure from Miller, R. F., and L. Eddleman. Spatial and temporal changes of sage-grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) once occupied parts of 12 states within the western United States and 3 Canadian tions of greater sage-grouse have undergone long-term population declines.

The sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) habitats on which sage-grouse depend have experienced extensive alteration and uently, concerns raised for the conservation and. Habitats characterized by an open tree canopy may support sage-grouse when the canopy is reduced, whereas habitats dominated by sagebrush may cease to support sage-grouse when the density and height of trees is increased; changes in the frequency of fire may have a fundamental influence in these processes (Miller and Eddleman ).4.

Miller RF, Eddleman LE () Spatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome. Tech Bull Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station.

5. Schroeder MA, Aldridge CL, Apa AD, et al. () Distribution of sage-grouse in North America. Condor 6.